Tailor-made at the heart of Soho

Written by Nika Garrett on .

Tailor-made at the heart of Soho

He has made suits for Johnny Depp, Tom Hanks, Mat Lucas, Nick Cave as well as famous films and TV series; Casino Royal, Sherlock Holmes 2, Dr Who.... The list of Chris Kerr bespoke tailor's clients reads like a Who's Who in the entertainment world, and yet just like his father, he makes suits for a modern man. As I am about to learn, you will need to have about £1,600 or £1,700, if you'd like to have your suit made by Chris Kerr. This indeed sounds affordable, if you make a comparison with Saville Row bespoke tailors.

"Chris Kerr is a bespoke tailor in the Strictest Saville Row tradition – the only things that separate him from that famous street are a relaxed attitude and a Soho address." Says the text on the website.

I arrive at Berwick Street much too early and take a stroll around soaking in the sunshine. I walk past Cotton Café with just one table on the pavement outside and one customer, and stop in front of what used to be Chris' and his father Eddie's tailor's shop at No 52. Then I walk back and end up hanging out outside the Reckless Records shop studying the image of Berwick Street in the photo which was used on the cover of Oasis' album "(What's the Story) Morning Glory". Finally, after another look at the purple façade next door and gorgeous suits as well as a bizarre dog's head on top of one of the mannequins in the window display, I take up my courage and walk in.... You see, I have never interviewed anyone before.

Save the @RoseTheatreSE1 - the first playhouse on Bankside

Written by Nika Garrett on .

Save the @RoseTheatreSE1 - the first playhouse on Bankside

This article originally appeared as a guest post at www.museumlines.com

Take a walk along the Thames Bankside any time between 10am and 5pm on a Saturday and you may notice a sign to The Rose Playhouse. Follow the chalk arrows on the pavement and you will find the site of the very first playhouse built on Bankside in 1587. Spend some time here and you might just fall in love. Watch a short film about its unique history, listen to a talk about its present day as a theatre and its plans for the future. You may even get to enjoy some scenes performed from one of Shakespeare’s plays! A reconstructive cutaway view of the first Rose, by William Dudley.

Turner And The Thames In Chelsea

Written by Nika Garrett on .

Turner And The Thames In Chelsea

This post has been written as a guest post for social media freelancer Mina Zaher for her great website King's Road Rocks! Mina has lived in Chelsea since she was 3 and King's Road has shaped some of her most wonderful memories.

At 10am on the 19th December 1851, Joseph Mallord William Turner died in his home in Chelsea. It was a foggy morning and yet just before his death, the sun managed to break through the fog to shine at the face of the man who was to become known as "the painter of light".

To find out why I have included this image of contemporary Chelsea please read the whole post at King's Road Rocks!

The Ghost Of Thomas More's House In Chelsea - Part1

Written by Nika Garrett on .

The Ghost Of Thomas More's House In Chelsea - Part1

‘More’ wrote Erasmus, ‘hath built near London upon the Thames  a commodious house, neither mean nor subject to envy, yet magnificent enough; there he converseth with his family, his wife, his son and daughter-in-law, his three daughters and their husbands, with eleven grandchildren…’

In fact it appears that Erasmus never visited his friend in Chelsea, but Thomas More’s residence must have been comfortable enough to accommodate such a big household.  Nobody knows for sure what the residence and the land around looked like but a famous Knyff/Kip view of Chelsea shows the house and the gardens that once belonged to Thomas More. This image of 1690s identifies it as ‘The House  att Chelsea … of the Most Noble &Potent Prince Henry Duke of Beaufort…’ More’s former estate looks carefully planned with vast gardens where he would keep a small menagerie that  included rabbits, a monkey, a fox, a ferret, and a weasel and exotic birds. As it is often said, he was fond of watching their habits.

A Walk in Canary Wharf

Written by A. Maria Perez on .

A Walk in Canary Wharf

When Nika Garret, proposed me to write an article about a Spanish related historic place in London, I immediately thought of writing about Canary Wharf because of the multiple significances for me.

Being one of London's two main financial centres – along with the traditional City of London – and home to the world headquarters of numerous major banks, professional services firms and media organisations, I have always been fascinated with it. Canary Wharf had an undeniable historical and commercial relationship with Spain for more than forty years, more concretely, with the Canary Islands – where I was born – that had also left an important trace in the history, culture and language of the islands.